Archive for November, 2010

We remember George

November 29, 2010

Nine years after his death, we still remember George Harrison. This clip, from the 2nd Annual Prince’s Trust concert, includes Ringo and Phil Collins on drums, a huge horn section and I think that’s Elton John playing one of the keyboards.

In this video, the Beatles sing Something, another great George Harrison number.

Is MySpace still around?

November 17, 2010

Hey MySpace, what’s up?

As most musicians know, Facebook has far outpaced MySpace. While MySpace has 130 million users, Facebook has over 500 million.

Erin McKeown notified me (via Facebook) about this NPR story on what’s new with MySpace. They’re reinventing themselves, refocusing on the category of social entertainment. According to NPR, that’s no big deal.

“MySpace’s new strategy and design are largely being greeted with a yawn.”

According to Nancy Baym, a communications professor who is studying social networks, no one is getting particularly excited about MySpace. Music, TV and film sites are springing up all the time. Some examples for musicians include Bandcamp, Bandzoogle, Nimbit, Topspin, ReverbNation, Soundcloud, Noisetrade and Fanbridge, among others. So there’s plenty of competition.

For musicians, the bigger question is, which one do I use? Erin McKeown says “There are so many different places for people to go and get information about tour dates and listen to your music and find out more about you, I feel like I need to have a hand in all of them. MySpace for me, happens to be at the bottom of that list.”

Listen to or read the entire NPR story here.

The day Steve Jobs dissed Derek Sivers

November 12, 2010
Steve Jobs announces iTunes in 2003

Steve Jobs announces iTunes in 2003

I have to share this amazing story. In his recent post, Derek Sivers, founder of CD Baby, recounts how 2003 was a huge turning point for independent artists.

Read it here.

Excerpt:

In May 2003, Apple invited me to their headquarters to discuss getting CD Baby’s catalog into the iTunes Music Store.

iTunes had just launched two weeks before, with only some music from the major labels. Many of us in the music biz were not sure this idea was going to work.
Especially those who had seen companies like eMusic do this exact same model for years without big success.

I flew to Cupertino thinking I’d be meeting with one of their marketing or tech people. When I arrived, I found out that about a hundred people from small record labels and distributors had also been invited.

We all went into a little presentation room, not knowing what to expect.

Then out comes Steve Jobs. Whoa! Wow.

He was in full persuasive presentation mode. Trying to convince all of us to give Apple our entire catalog of music. Talking about iTunes success so far, and all the reasons we should work with them.

He really made a point of saying, “We want the iTunes Music Store to have every piece of music ever recorded. Even if it’s discontinued or not selling much, we want it all.”

This was huge to me, because until 2003, independent musicians were always denied access to the big outlets. For Apple to sell all music, not just artists who had signed their rights away to a corporation, this was amazing!

Read the rest here.